Gyroplane Regulations

The U.S. government manages and controls airspace, certification, and regulations for both the pilot and the aircraft. The best source of information on regulations for gyroplanes is the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) website.

You should start with the aviation authority (FAA) website (faa.gov), as well as the websites of aviation associations and flying clubs, or by talking to instructors and gyroplane pilots. Some keywords to search for are: gyroplane, gyrocopter, autogyroplane, rotorcraft, and experimental amateur aircraft.

Visit FAA.gov
FAA

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the agency that regulates aircraft. Gyroplanes are considered rotorcraft in the category of experimental amateur aircraft. GYROFOX gyroplane kits are production kits and assemblies designed for self-assembly by a gyroplane builder.

A gyroplane builder is the person who assembles the major part of the aircraft, defined as more than 50% of the fabrication and assembly work. The FAA refers to this as the Major Part Rule. It is also often referred to as the “51 percent rule.”

In order for a gyroplane to be certified under the Experimental Amateur-Built Aircraft category, the 51-percent builder must be an amateur who is building the aircraft for education or recreation. The builder must maintain a builder’s log and take pictures during construction. This information is provided to the builder must maintain a builder’s log and take pictures during construction. This information is provided to the FAA Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR) at the time of the aircraft’s airworthiness inspection, so an Airworthiness Certificate can be issued.

Contact your nearest FAA Flight Standards District Office (FISDO)

Gyroplanes are as safe as the pilots who build and fly them.